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Abstract No.: MoP-130
Session: Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry
Presentation date: Mon, Aug 28, 2006
Presentation time: 14:30 – 16:00

Development of an Aspiration Ion Mobility Spectrometer Mass Spectrometer Combination

Alexey Adamov1,2,3, Jyrki Viidanoja1, Esko Karpanoja4, Heikki Paakkanen4, Raimo A. Ketola2,5, Risto Kostiainen2, Alexey A. Sysoev3, Tapio Kotiaho1

1 Laboratory of Anal. Chemistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
2 Division of Pharm. Chemistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
3 Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, Moscow, Russian Federation
4 Environics Ltd., Mikkeli, Finland
5 DDTC, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland

Correspondence address: Alexey Adamov, University of Helsinki, Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, A.I. Virtasen aukio 1, Helsinki, 00014 Finland.

Keywords: Ion Mobility; Mass Spectrometry; Mass Spectrometry, Ion Mobility; Separations.

Novel aspect: Combining an aspiration ion mobility spectrometer with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer has been presented for the first time.

 

Objectives
Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is a fast and sensitive analytical technique in which analytes in ionic form are separated based on their characteristic ion mobilities. Besides to the conventional drift tube ion mobility spectrometers1 other ion mobility spectrometers including high field asymmetric wave form ion mobility spectrometer2 and aspiration ion mobility spectrometer3 have been developed. An aspiration ion mobility spectrometer is characterized by a simple and miniaturized design. No specific carrier or drift gas is used and the ions are separated under weak electric fields (typically 7500 V/m). Combining an aspiration ion mobility spectrometer with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer is presented for the first time.

Methods
An interface to combine an aspiration type of ion mobility spectrometer to a mass spectrometer was developed. The interface is designed so that it allows quick mounting of the aspiration ion mobility spectrometer on a mass spectrometer. The mass spectrometer used in this study was an API-300 (Applied Biosystems-Sciex, Canada) that was earlier combined with drift tube IMS.4,5 An aspiration ion mobility spectrometer IMCellTM (Environics Oy, Mikkeli, Finland) equipped with a 241Am ion source was used. The only modification made to the instrument was a rectangular hole (5x0.5 mm) drilled in the middle of the third collecting electrode in order to allow the ions to be transferred to the mass spectrometer.

Results
At first, the gas flows into (sample flow) and from (waste flow) the aspiration ion mobility spectrometer were optimized. The optimum for the best peak shape and signal intensity was found at sample/waste flow of ≅1.08. At this value the gas flow through the orifice in the collecting electrode is expected to be weak enough so that mobility separation is not significantly affected but strong enough for assisting the ion transmission through the rectangular orifice into the mass spectrometer (small size was necessary to ensure that deflection field would not be influenced by the hole). Mass-selected ion mobility signal of 2,6-di-tert-butyl pyridine was measured.

Conclusions
Performance of the instrument is demonstrated using 2,6-di-tert-butyl pyridine. The hyphenated instrument can be used for gathering fundamental information on aspiration ion mobility spectrometry.

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3. T. Katto, H. Paakkanen, T. Karhapaa, Proc. 4th Int. Symp Protection Against Chemical Warfare Agents 103, (1992).
4. A. Sysoev, A. Adamov, J. Viidanoja, R. Ketola, R. Kostiainen, T. Kotiaho, Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 18, 3131 (2004).
5. J. Viidanoja, A. Sysoev, A. Adamov, T. Kotiaho, Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 19, 3051 (2005).